NTT DoCoMo Group to Conduct 10th Reforestation Project

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TOKYO, JAPAN, May 12, 2004 --- NTT DoCoMo, Inc. and its regional subsidiaries announced today that they will conduct a 10th "DoCoMo Woods" reforestation campaign. This environmental initiative is part of DoCoMo's ongoing activities to preserve the natural environment.

On May 15, approximately 90 DoCoMo group employees will travel to the Onohara National Forest in Saga Prefecture to plant "mountain cherry" and other seedlings, as well as trim the existing "hinoki cypress" cover, in an area measuring approximately 2 hectares.

DoCoMo launched its first reforestation project on May 15, 1999, planting new trees in Yamaguchi prefecture. On June 1, 1999, DoCoMo subsequently unveiled a Corporate Environmental Policy setting out guidelines for its future environmental preservation activities. Under the nine reforestation campaigns to date, DoCoMo has provided tree cover for a total 59.31 hectares.

DoCoMo will continue activities to preserve the ecology in the future based on its official environmental policy.


About NTT DoCoMo
NTT DoCoMo is the world's leading mobile communications company with more than 48 million customers. The company provides a wide variety of leading-edge mobile multimedia services. These include i-mode®, the world's most popular mobile internet service, which provides e-mail and internet access to over 41 million subscribers, and FOMA®, launched in 2001 as the world's first 3G mobile service based on W-CDMA. In addition to wholly owned subsidiaries in Europe and North America, the company is expanding its global reach through strategic alliances with mobile and multimedia service providers in Asia-Pacific, Europe and North America. NTT DoCoMo is listed on the Tokyo (9437), London (NDCM), and New York (DCM) stock exchanges. For more information, visit www.nttdocomo.co.jp/english

i-mode and FOMA are trademarks or registered trademarks of NTT DoCoMo, Inc. in Japan and other countries.
NTT DoCoMo's FOMA service is available only to subscribers in Japan.

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